Indigenous Housing Indicators 2003-04

TitleIndigenous Housing Indicators 2003-04
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare
KeywordsAUS - AustraliaA - Arnhem Land, Discrete Settlements Discrete Urban Settlements Ou, Generated, HousingNeeds - homelessness, Major Cities of Australia, overcrowdingManagemen, Urban dwelling Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island
Abstract

The report provides data on Indigenous housing that can be used to monitor progress in the seven outcome areas outlined in �Building a Better Future: Indigenous Housing to 2010. The seven outcome areas were each measured using a number of the 38 Indicators of the National Reporting Framework for Indigenous Housing (NRF). These outcome areas and the indicators used were: Outcome 1: Better Housing - Housing that meets agreed standards, is appropriate to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and contributes to their health and wellbeing Indicators: Proportion of improvised dwellings; proportion of dwellings needing major repairs; proportion of dwellings needing replacement; mechanisms to ensure that new houses and upgrades meet state and territory minimum standards; proportion of communities connected to water, sewage and electricity; proportion of dwellings meeting the nine FHBH healthy living standards; total and average number of additional bedrooms required across all tenure types; proportion of overcrowded households across all tenure types; proportion of households paying 25% o more of income in rent; proportion of clients satisfied with amenity and location of their dwelling. (AIHW 2005:5.) Outcome 2: Better Housing Services- Services that are well managed and sustainable. Indicators: Proportion of dwellings needing replacement; average weekly rent collected; rent collected as a percentage of total rent charged; total, and average amount spent on maintenance each year; maintenance expenditure as a proportion of rent collected; recurrent to capital expenditure ratio; number of Indigenous community housing organisations; proportion of organizations that have a housing management plan; what jurisdictions are doing to assist ICHOs to develop and implement housing management plans; proportion of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who have completed accredited training in housing management and related areas; proportion of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who are undertaking accredited training in housing management and related areas; proportion of clients satisfied with quality of the service provided; proportion of organizations using rent deduction schemes. (AIHW 2005:37.) Outcome 3: More Housing Growth in the number of houses to address both the backlog of Indigenous housing need and emerging needs of a growth population Indicators: Total number of dwellings targeted for Indigenous people; proportion of Indigenous households housed by tenure type; proportion of Indigenous households accessing mainstream housing services; proportion of Indigenous people who are homeless; total and average number of additional bedrooms required across all tenure types; proportion of overcrowded households across all tenure types; proportion of households paying 25% o more of income in rent; proportion of organizations using rent deduction schemes. (AIHW 2005:66.) Outcome 4: Improved partnerships Ensuring Indigenous people are fully involved in planning, decision making and delivery of services. Indicators: Recurrent to capital expenditure ratio; proportion of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who have completed accredited training in housing management and related areas; proportion of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who are undertaking accredited training in housing management and related areas; proportion of people employed in housing management who are Indigenous; strategies and outcomes to increase Indigenous employment in housing services; mechanisms for Indigenous input to planning, decision making and delivery of services. (AIHW 2005:75.) Outcome 5; Greater effectiveness and efficiency Ensuring that assistance is properly directed to meeting objectives and that resources are being used to best advantage. Indicators: Total number of dwellings targeted for Indigenous people; occupancy rates; turnaround time; proportion of Indigenous households housed by tenure type; proportion of Indigenous households accessing mainstream housing services; allocations of resources on the basis of need; proportion of clients satisfied with quality of the service provided. (AIHW 2005:91.) Outcome 6: Improved performance linked to accountability Program performance reporting based on national data collection systems and good information management. Indicators: Average cost of providing assistance per dwelling; proportion of indicators�that jurisdictions could report on. (AIHW 2005:103.) Outcome 7: Coordination of services A whole of government approach that ensures greater coordination of housing and housing related services linked to improved health and wellbeing outcomes. Indicator: Coordination of housing and other services that seek to improve the health and well-being of Indigenous people. (AIHW 2005:108.) AIHW cat. No. HOU 127, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra June.

URLhttp://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442467725